A versatile and popular dish for many outdoor-oriented cooks in Arkansas is duck fingers. It’s adaptable for family dinners and party gatherings and allows options for individual tastes.

A versatile and popular dish for many outdoor-oriented cooks in Arkansas is duck fingers. It’s adaptable for family dinners and party gatherings and allows options for individual tastes.


The basics are to cut skin-removed duck breasts into strips about a half-inch wide, season them, coat them then grill, broil or fry.


All right, substitute snow goose – that will be all dark meat like duck — and go ahead with the tasty, hearty dish. It will be the talk of a fun-filled party.


Skin out the breasts from the goose carcass. There won’t be much other meat left, but you can save it for other uses like gumbo or dressing with meat. Slice the breast into strips, and some cooks prefer to slice it across the grain, some do it with the grain, some angle-cut it.


Soak the goose strips several hours or overnight in cold salt water. Season the strips anyway you want – salt, black pepper, red pepper, chili powder, Italian seasoning, Cavender’s. You may want to go light on the salt.


Coat the strips anyway you want – dip in egg beaten with milk or water then roll in flour is one technique. Roll in cornmeal is another. Use finely crushed cracker crumbs. Roll in grated Parmesan cheese is still another and the Parmesan cheese can be combined with the flour or the cornmeal or the cracker crumbs.


Cook with high heat. This can be on a charcoal or gas grill, fried in vegetable oil or broiled in the oven. Be careful not to overcook the fingers. Remember the axioms of cooking wild game – it is lean and will tend to dry out quicker than chicken or beef. For fingers, cooked to medium or medium rare usually results in the best tasting items.


Serve while hot and accompaniments can be ranch dressing, blue cheese dressing,


cocktail sauce – or nothing.


Expect the platter to be emptied rapidly.