LITTLE ROCK — Four more presidential candidates filed paperwork to appear on Arkansas’ ballot, and two more people filed to run for the 2nd District congressional seat on Monday, the last day of filing for state, federal and nonpartisan judicial offices.

LITTLE ROCK — Four more presidential candidates filed paperwork to appear on Arkansas’ ballot, and two more people filed to run for the 2nd District congressional seat on Monday, the last day of filing for state, federal and nonpartisan judicial offices.


By the end of the week-long filing period, 19 presidential candidates had completed paperwork for spots on the ballot in Arkansas’ March 1 primary election. On Monday, John Wolfe of Chattanooga, Tenn., filed in person at the state Capitol to appear on the Democratic ballot and representatives of former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal filed for spots on the Republican ballot.


Wolfe, an attorney, ran for president in 2012 and received 42 percent of the vote in Arkansas’ Democratic primary. After the state Democratic party said Wolfe was not entitled to any delegates because he had not filed all required documents, he filed a lawsuit that eventually was dismissed.


He told reporters Monday that this time he will provide every document the party requires.


"The Democratic Party needs an alternative, I think," Wolfe said. "I don’t think Hillary Clinton is the right person for this year."


Clinton supported invading Iraq, Wolfe said, and as a result of that war "you have a power vacuum for terrorists."


Wolfe also said Clinton "pretends to be a populist" but is backed by bankers and said Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has failed to challenge Clinton on her record.


Last week, five Democratic presidential candidates filed for Arkansas’ ballot: Clinton, Sanders, Martin O’Malley, James Valentine and Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente. Filing for the Republican ballot last week were Mike Huckabee, Ted Cruz, Ben Carson, Jeb Bush, John Kasich, Marco Rubio, Donald Trump, Chris Christie, Carly Fiorina and Lindsey Graham.


Two major Republican Party candidates, former New York Gov. George Pataki and former Virginia Gov. Jim Gilmore, did not file in Arkansas.


Democrats are fielding a candidate for only one of Arkansas’ four U.S. House seats. Former Little Rock School Board President Dianne Curry filed Monday to run for the 2nd District seat, now held by Rep. French Hill, R-Little Rock, who filed last week to seek re-election.


Curry said the issues of her campaign will include improving access to education, creating more and better-paying jobs, promoting women’s issues, helping ex-convicts return to society and opposing efforts to defund Planned Parenthood. Hill has voted to block federal funding to Planned Parenthood.


"There are other support systems (provided by Planned Parenthood) other than just the things that have been criticized," she said.


Brock Olree of Searcy filed Monday to run as a Republican candidate for Hill’s seat. Last week, Pulaski County resident Chris Hayes filed to run as a Libertarian candidate for the seat.


U.S. Sen. John Boozman, R-Ark., filed for re-election and faces a Republican challenger, Curtis Coleman of Little Rock. Also seeking the seat are a Democrat, former U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Arkansas Conner Eldridge of Fayetteville, and a Libertarian, Frank Gilbert of Tull.


U.S. Rep. Bruce Westerman, R-Hot Springs, is seeking re-election in the 4th District and faces a Libertarian challenger, Kerry Hicks of Mena.


U.S. Rep. Steve Womack, R-Rogers, is seeking re-election in the 3rd District and faces a challenge from Libertarian Nathan LaFrance of Bella Vista.


U.S. Rep. Rick Crawford, R-Jonesboro, is running for re-election in the 1st District and will be challenged by Libertarian Mark West of Oil Trough.


Two races developed for Arkansas Supreme Court seats. Circuit Judge Shawn Womack of Mountain Home and Little Rock lawyer Clark Mason will compete for the position now held by retiring Justice Paul Danielson, and Justice Courtney Goodson will compete with Circuit Judge Dan Kemp of Mountain View for the position of chief justice.


Among the legislative candidates who submitted paperwork on the last day of filing was John Arthur Hammerschmidt of Harrison, son of John Paul Hammerschmidt, who served in Congress for 26 years before retiring in 1993 and died in April.


John Arthur Hammerschmidt, a Republican, is seeking the state House District 98 seat, now held by Rep. Ron McNair, R-Alpena, who filed for re-election. No Democrat filed for the seat.


A list of filings is available at www.sos.arkansas.gov.