LITTLE ROCK — Homelessness is declining in Arkansas, but homelessness among veterans in the state has increased, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

LITTLE ROCK — Homelessness is declining in Arkansas, but homelessness among veterans in the state has increased, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.


The report, released Thursday, shows that 2,560 people were homeless in Arkansas in January of this year. That’s down 12.8 percent from January 2014 and down 10.2 percent from January 2009.


Nationwide, 564,708 people were homeless in January of this year, which is down 2 percent from January 2014 and down 10.4 percent from January 2009.


The numbers in HUD’s annual reports on homelessness are based on counts of homeless people sleeping in sheltered and unsheltered locations on a single night in late January each year. Volunteers across the country conduct the counts and report the results to HUD.


This year’s report also states that 207 veterans were homeless in Arkansas in January. That’s an 83 percent increase from January 2009, and it makes Arkansas one of only five states to have seen homelessness among veterans increase by more than 100 people since 2009.


The other states all had smaller numbers of homeless veterans than Arkansas in January. They are Utah with 171 people, up 103 percent from 2009; Oregon with 187 people, up 15 percent; Hawaii with 193 people, up 39 percent; and Illinois with 198 people, up 19 percent.


Nationwide, 47,725 veterans were homeless in January. That means that of the 436,921 homeless adults in the U.S., more than one in 10 was a veteran.


Homelessness among veterans has decreased by 35 percent since 2009 nationwide, according to the report.


The report also looks at the availability of beds that communities provide the homeless and the formerly homeless. In January there were 830,120 year-round beds available in the U.S. and 2,486 in Arkansas.


"Arkansas has made progress in combating homelessness," Tammye Trevino, HUD regional administrator, said in a news release announcing the report. "Having seen decreases in the overall numbers of those experiencing homelessness, we know that caring people are coming together, applying programs and compassion to end homelessness across the state. And while there is much to be done, we know it is working."


President Barack Obama launched Opening Doors, his plan for preventing and ending homelessness, in 2010.


"The Obama administration has made an historic commitment to effectively end homelessness in this nation," HUD Secretary Julian Castro said in the release. "Together with our partners across the federal government and communities from coast to coast, we have made tremendous progress toward our ambitious goals. But our work is far from finished. We have to continue making smart investments in the strategies that work so that everyone has a roof over their head."


HUD said that although the president has requested increased funding for homelessness assistance each year, the funding has not kept pace with the need, which the agency said is why the decrease in national homelessness from January 2014 to January of this year was an "insignificant" 2 percent.