LITTLE ROCK — The state Ethics Commission on Friday dismissed a complaint against a member of state Treasurer Dennis Milligan’s staff.

LITTLE ROCK — The state Ethics Commission on Friday dismissed a complaint against a member of state Treasurer Dennis Milligan’s staff.


In a letter to Jason Brady, Milligan’s deputy chief of staff, commission Director Graham Sloan said the agency investigated a complaint against Brady and found no violations of state ethics laws. The complaint was filed by Jefferson County Republican Committee member Susan Over.


The investigation showed that Brady incurred an out-of-pocket expense with Facebook while serving as Milligan’s volunteer campaign manager during his 2014 election bid and was reimbursed by the campaign, Sloan said in the letter.


But Sloan said the Ethics Commission concluded that the fact that Brady, a registered lobbyist at the time, did not report the transaction on lobbyist activity reports was not a violation because the transaction did not constitute "money loaned or promised or a line of credit established."


Sloan said Brady was not required to file campaign finance reports on behalf of the campaign, but he said a political campaign that reimburses a volunteer for an out-pocket expenditure is required to report that reimbursement as an expenditure.


Earlier this month, Milligan agreed to pay a $400 fine and accept a public letter of warning from the commission for omitting certain information from campaign finance reports, which Milligan later corrected. The omissions included $751 in expenditures for Facebook advertising made by Brady.


The investigation into the complaint against Brady also showed that he performed tasks for Milligan’s campaign while at his lobbying job with the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, using his employer’s equipment, Sloan said in the letter.


The Arkansas News Bureau first reported last April that Brady conducted business for Milligan’s campaign while on the job for the nonprofit organization and that Brady apparently sought to conceal this fact from his employer, telling campaign staff members in an email that "for my job security, I can NOT be listed anywhere on a campaign contribution report."


The Ethics Commission concluded Friday that Brady’s activities did not constitute an illegal campaign contribution in excess of $2,000. In an interview, Sloan said the commission found that Brady’s actions could not be construed as a campaign contribution from him because he was a campaign volunteer, and the use of the nonprofit organization’s resources for the campaign could not be construed as a campaign contribution from the organization because it did not sanction or even know about Brady’s actions for Milligan.


The commission felt the situation was "an employment matter" between Brady and his former employer, Sloan said.


The vote to dismiss the complaint was 3-0, with two members absent.