LITTLE ROCK — With the support of the Arkansas delegation, the House on Tuesday gave final approval to resolutions to disapprove of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan and a rule limiting carbon emissions from new power plants.

LITTLE ROCK — With the support of the Arkansas delegation, the House on Tuesday gave final approval to resolutions to disapprove of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan and a rule limiting carbon emissions from new power plants.


The resolution on the Clean Power Plan, which aims to reduce carbon emissions from power plants by 32 percent by 2030, passed 242-180. The resolution on the rule for new power plants passed 235-188.


Both measures previously cleared the Senate, with the support of Arkansas’ two senators, and head next to President Barack Obama’s desk. He is expected to veto both measures.


"Passage of these resolutions opposing the Obama administration’s attack on fossil fuels is a stand for Arkansas’ economic well-being and will be better for the environment in the long run," Rep. Bruce Westerman, R-Hot Springs, said in a statement after the vote.


"The citizens of Arkansas continue to pay the price for the president’s executive actions," he said. "We must put an end to the executive branch’s out-of-control policy making, which will cause a loss of American jobs and hurt the bottom line of families across Arkansas. It’s the job of Congress to make policy, not the president."


Speaking on the House floor Tuesday, Rep. Steve Womack, R-Rogers, said, "There’s no question that we are all searching for a brighter future for generations to come. We disagree, however, on how to get there and, in this case, the effects that our decisions could have on the environment and the American family in the process.


"Frankly, the EPA’s Clean Power Plan will result in little to no environmental benefit at the expense of thousands of jobs and countless dollars and hours spent on compliance, all for the sake of an unrelenting government agency’s agenda and the desired environmental legacy of this administration. It’s as simple as that," he said.


House Republicans sought to undermine Obama during climate talks in Paris. In a news conference Tuesday before returning from Paris, Obama said he believes his successor in the White House will take the challenge of climate change seriously, regardless of party.