WASHINGTON — The House, deeply divided along partisan lines, voted Wednesday to block President Obama from implementing recent executive orders on immigration that would allow millions of undocumented foreigners to remain in the United States.

WASHINGTON — The House, deeply divided along partisan lines, voted Wednesday to block President Obama from implementing recent executive orders on immigration that would allow millions of undocumented foreigners to remain in the United States.


In a series of mostly party-line votes, House Republicans supported proposals they said are needed to rein in an executive branch set on ignoring the will of Congress as proscribed by the U.S. Constitution.


House Democrats opposed the measures as a dangerous "political vendetta" that could jeopardize national security. The proposals were considered as part of a larger $40 billion bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security through the fiscal year.


The Arkansas delegation — all Republican — voted in favor of reining in President Obama. Freshman Rep. Bruce Westerman, R-Hot Springs, spoke for the first time on the House floor on Wednesday in support of blocking the administration from spending any money to implement an executive order issued last November that would defer deportation action for millions of illegal immigrants.


"Many of my constituents are much like me: We are ready for a government that works like the one we studied in civics class. One with co-equal branches of power," Westerman said. "Winston Churchill once stated that the price of greatness is responsibility. As members of the legislative branch, voting yes for this amendment is a responsible step in the right direction."


Rep. David Price, D-N.C., complained that Republicans had launched "a political vendetta" against President Obama in a "reprehensible, reckless" way. Adopting the measures, he said, would "sabotage the Homeland Security Funding bill and undermine our nation’s security at a time of great danger."


Homeland Security money expires at the end of February.


House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, spoke in favor of the effort, calling Obama’s executive order "an affront to the rule of law and to the Constitution itself."


"The people made clear that they wanted more accountability from this president, and by our votes here today we will heed their will and we will keep our oath to protect and defend the Constitution," he said.


The Homeland Security bill passed, 236-191, after a series of amendments aimed at Obama’s immigration policy were approved along similar partisan lines. The bill now heads to the Senate.


In an interview Wednesday, Westerman defended his support for the GOP amendments.


"I see it as government at work. All these amendments are about separation of power more than anything else," he said. "We have a mandate from the people to rein in the executive branch and to establish the authority and power of Congress. That is what I see these amendments doing."


Westerman said he does not see the GOP amendments as "poison pills" to funding the Department of Homeland Security.


"I am all in favor of the DHS bill and I hope the President will sign it. It will be up to him whether he vetoes this," Westerman said.


Reps. Rick Crawford, R-Jonesboro, Steve Womack, R-Rogers, and French Hill, R-Little Rock, also voted in favor of the amendments and bill.


"President Obama’s unilateral actions on immigration were an attempt to legislate from the Oval Office and overstepped his constitutional enumerated powers. In December, House Republicans made a promise to the American people to stop this blatant overreach when reinforcement arrived in the Senate, and I applaud the passage of this bill, which makes good on that promise with careful cuts and tough policy changes," Womack said.


"Today’s bill provides essential funding for our homeland security and repeals the President’s unlawful executive overreach on immigration policy that has worsened our illegal immigration crisis, violated the Constitution, and punished those who have come to this country legally," Hill said.